NMR based quantum computing: gates and state preparation

In my last post on NMR based quantum computing, we have seen how an individual qubit can be implemented based on NMR technology. However, just having a single qubit is of course not really helpful - what we are still missing is the ability to initialize several qubits and to realize interacting quantum gates. These … Continue reading NMR based quantum computing: gates and state preparation

Single qubit NMR based quantum computation

In the previous post, we have sketched the basic ideas behind NMR based quantum computation. In this post, we will discuss single qubits and single qubit operations in more depth. The rotating frame of reference In NMR based quantum computing, quantum gates are realized by applying oscillating magnetic fields to our probe. As an oscillating … Continue reading Single qubit NMR based quantum computation

Quantum phase estimation – the quantum algorithm Swiss army knife

When you are faced with a problem in linear algebra and have absolutely no idea what to do, an eigenvalue decomposition is the one thing that you would typically try first. In the world of quantum algorithms, the situation is similar - finding the eigenvalues of a matrix is a central building block of many … Continue reading Quantum phase estimation – the quantum algorithm Swiss army knife

Quantum error correction with stabilizer codes

In our previous discussion of quantum error correction, we have assumed that quantum gates can act on any two physical qubits. In reality, however, this is not true - only nearby qubits and interact, and our error correction needs to take the geometric arrangements of the qubits into account. The link between these geometric constraints … Continue reading Quantum error correction with stabilizer codes

Basics of quantum error correction

Do usable universal quantum computers exist today? If you follow the recent press releases, you might believe that the answer is "yes", with IBM announcing a 50 qubit quantum computer and Google promoting its Bristlecone architecture with up to 72 qubits. Unfortunately, the world is more complicated than this - time to demystify the hype … Continue reading Basics of quantum error correction

Into the quantum lab – first steps with IBMs Q experience

Even though physical implementations of quantum computers make considerable progress, it is not likely that you will have one of them under your desk in the next couple of years. Fortunately, some firms like IBM and Rigetti have decided to make some of their quantum devices available only so that you can play with them. … Continue reading Into the quantum lab – first steps with IBMs Q experience