Running the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm on IBMs Q experience

In one of the previous posts, we have looked at the basics of the Qiskit package that allows us to create and run quantum algorithms in Python. In this post, we will apply this to model and execute a real quantum algorithm - the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm. Recall that the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm is designed to solve … Continue reading Running the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm on IBMs Q experience

Quantum error correction with stabilizer codes

In our previous discussion of quantum error correction, we have assumed that quantum gates can act on any two physical qubits. In reality, however, this is not true - only nearby qubits and interact, and our error correction needs to take the geometric arrangements of the qubits into account. The link between these geometric constraints … Continue reading Quantum error correction with stabilizer codes

Fault tolerant quantum computing

In the previous post, we have looked at the basic ideas behind quantum error correction, namely the encoding of logical states so that we are able to detect and correct errors like bit flip and phase flip errors. Unfortunately, this is not yet good enough to implement quantum computing in a fault-tolerant way. What is … Continue reading Fault tolerant quantum computing

Basics of quantum error correction

Do usable universal quantum computers exist today? If you follow the recent press releases, you might believe that the answer is "yes", with IBM announcing a 50 qubit quantum computer and Google promoting its Bristlecone architecture with up to 72 qubits. Unfortunately, the world is more complicated than this - time to demystify the hype … Continue reading Basics of quantum error correction

Using Python to access IBMs quantum computers

In a previous post, we have looked at IBMs Q experience and the graphical composer that you can use to build simple circuits and run them on the IBM hardware. Alternatively, the quantum hardware can be addressed using an API and a Python library called Qiskit which we investigate in this post. Installation and setup … Continue reading Using Python to access IBMs quantum computers

Accessing your hard drive – the OS developers moment of truth

When building your own operating system, the moment when you first write data to a real physical hard disk of a real PC is nothing less than thrilling - after all, making a mistake at this point could mean that you happily overwrite data on your hard drive randomly and wipe out important data on … Continue reading Accessing your hard drive – the OS developers moment of truth

Quantum simulation

In his famous lecture Simulating Physics with computers, Nobel laureate Richard Feynman argued that non-trivial quantum systems cannot efficiently be simulated on a classical computer, but on a quantum computer - a claim which is widely considered to be one of the cornerstones in the development of quantum computing. Time to ask whether a universal … Continue reading Quantum simulation